Uluru (Ayers Rock)

In 2015 I had the opportunity to to the Northern Territory, Alice Springs to be precise, with the intent to make it down to Uluru.

I had been wanting to get to the Australia outback for some time, and the opportunity came my way to meet with a friend who was driving back to Sydney from Alice Springs. I headed to the airport and took the next available flight to Alice Springs, and the adventure began. It is quite a drive from Alice Springs to Uluru, 335km to be exact, and nothing quite prepares you for the site of Uluru against a clear blue sky as it almost looks painted on, very surreal.

Not only is it a spectacular natural formation, Uluru is a deeply spiritual place. You can feel a powerful presence the moment you set eyes on it. At 348 metres high, Uluru is one of the world’s largest monoliths, towering over the surrounding landscape and some 550 million years old.

Made of sandstone, Uluru is often referred to as the heart of the ‘Red Centre’ and is one of Australia’s most recognisable landmarks. Breathe in, see the colours change before your eyes, hear the stories of time and be amazed as Uluru captures your heart. It is a must see for all Australians as it can look very different to most images you see of it.

For the local Aboriginal people, the Anangu, World Heritage-listed Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park holds a special cultural significance where earth and memories exist as one. Feel the connection to the land as this iconic rock formation hides ancient wisdom and diverse plant and animal life. Discover an awe-inspiring landscape where creation stories are whispered on the winds.

There is roadway all around Uluru, but for the adventurous, you can hire push bikes and ride the 9.4km around it instead. Be warned, the only shop to get refreshments from is closed after 1PM (or at least it was on the day we were there) so if it is a hot day, I would advise staying in the car, or being prepared with your own drinks etc.

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